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Bermuda Breakfast – Salt Cod transformed

Bermuda Breakfast
Bermuda Breakfast
Bermuda Breakfast

Bermuda Breakfast or Brunch

 

Salted Cod is a very old Scottish tradition dating back to the Vikings. There is a great company in the Shetland Isles making the finest quality salted cod, and I urge you to try and use this truly great food.  Before fridges this kind of food was a staple in Scotland and it deserves to return to the table.  Shetland Salt Cod link. The Sheltand company makes hard dried cod, but there are also other sources of salt cod easier to use online at Amazon.

Go to France or Spain and everywhere you look is salt cod. But over here it is very difficult to find and often poor quality. The Shetland Salt Fish is top of the line and worth a try. Many people want to reduce their red meat intake but struggle to find alternatives. This keeps well in the fridge (we keep salt fish for up to 3 months), is quick and easy to prepare and tastes truly amazing. Our two sons love this healthy meal.

This recipe comes from Bermuda  and is used by most families as a brunch or late breakfast on Sundays. I used to go to my old friend Eugene Harvey (now in Washington) house where his mother cooked for about 20 children and aunts and uncles and cousins. Their house overlooked the Sound, clear blue waters.  This dish sounds odd, but the combination of flavours is stunning.

If you are going to Bermuda this site tells you where to eat this and also gives an alternative recipe – Bermuda Breakfast

 

Ingredients

Salted Codfish (soaked overnight in water 250 gm serves about 4)
Whole potatoes ideally from Scotland and firm when boiled
Eggs (1 each)
Bananas (1 each)
Avocado (half each)
Tomatoes (tinned quality plum)
Onions, garlic, peppers, salt and pepper
Green pepper sliced

teaspoon of sugar

Method

Put the potatoes, codfish and eggs in a big pot and boil until potato done (about 15 minutes)
Drain and separate
Meanwhile take a frying pan and cook the onions, peppers and garlic slowly until soft and transparent. Add tinned tomato’s chopped or rough blend with sugar and cook covered on low heat for 15 minutes or so. Then add flaked fish and salt and pepper to taste. The salt fish will add plenty salt.

Serve

Put potato, sliced banana, slice of avocado, and halved egg on plate and spoon fish and tomato mixture on side.  Liberally sprinkle codfish mix with Ooft! Hot Sauce
It is important to eat a little of each and you will be amazed how these flavour complement each other

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Chipotle Liver and Onions

Chipotle Liver and Onions

Liver and onions cooked in Ooft! Chipotle

Chipotle Liver and Onions
Chipotle Liver and Onions

Chipotle liver and onions a rich hearty dish for your evening meal. This lovely rich dish is much improved by adding Ooft! Chipotle Sauce while cooking. The smoky Chipotles develop the flavour.

Buy Ooft! smoky Chipotle to make this recipe here

Ingredients:

6 pieces lambs liver, 1 medium onion sliced, 1 fresh large tomato (or 1/2 tin chopped), half sweet pepper chopped, 3 tbs Ooft! Chipotle sauce, 1 tsp sun dried tomato paste, salt and pepper to taste, 3 tbs oil

Method: using 2 tbs oil, sweat onions and peppers and fresh tomato down until soft (if using tinned tomato add when onions soft), about 10 minutes. Dust liver strips in seasoned flour. Put aside onion mixture and add extra tbs oil and fry liver for 3 min a side. Return onion mix to pan and add Ooft! Chipotle, sun dried tomato paste, salt to taste and stir together to coat. Serve with mashed potato. Add more Chipotle sauce and sprinkle Coriander to dress.

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Doubles – Trinidad Street Food

A singles dressed

Cooking Doubles, Trinidad Street Food

singles
A plateful of singles
doubles
Preparing Doubles

A “doubles” is a special Trinidad street food made up of one (a singles) or two deep fried mini roti and a comfort food tasting, lightly curried, chickpea mixture. Of course being Trinidad that just the start. Add Ooft! Hot Sauce, add Tamarind sauce, add cucumber finely chopped and mixed with coriander and lime juice, add mango salsa, make it your own! The small fried roti is called a bara and the basic filling is called channa. Then you have the dressings.

Read this lovely review of Trinidad in the New York Times which highlights “doubles” in point 8 – see review

Of course doubles would not be complete without hot sauce so you can buy Ooft! here at this link

Bara mix-

225g white flour
1 tsp yeast
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp turmeric
1 tsp ground geera (cumin)
1/4 tsp sugar
1/4 tsp or less of salt
Approx 150mls warm water (might use little more or less)

Method: Combine all the ingredients, add water gradually
to make soft dough. Dough should not be to dry or to wet..
Cover 2-3tbs oil…sit for 2 hrs covered with cloth in a warm place.

Moisten hands with oil for each, use about golf ball size dough in hand, flatten into a circle…
Fry on med heat, when the bara rises to surface, take your spoon and toss hot oil over bara, it should puff up a bit, turn fry till light brown in color…
Have a bowl with lots of tissue and cloth to cover your bara..

singles
A plateful of singles

Cooking Channa (I use half bag)

Cook time 20-30mins
Pre soak overnight with 2tsp bicarbonate of soda…Rinse, drain well.
Add garlic clove, 1 tsp (chief)curry powder and salt to taste, cook in water until tender.
Drain channa, reserve the liquid…Heat oil, mix 1 clove finely chopped garlic, 1/2 onion finely chopped, 1tsp curry powder, 1-2 tbs chopped cilantro in 50ml water. Fry /sauté for 2 mins, (don’t burn the curry)
Add channa to pot & stir throughly. Add the reserve liquid, you can always add more water if channa not tender..When cooked mix in 1 tsp geera, stir and set aside…

 

Best eaten right away, as they say in Trinidad…”On de spot”
Serve as topping… mango chutney, cucumber chutney, tamarind sauce, Ooft! Of course…

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Ooft! home made hot sauce on the Table

Ooft! home made hot sauce is very pleased to announce that the wonderful Glasgow Science Centre, (link to GSC Website)  one of Scotland’s premier visitor venues attracting thousands of families annually from all over the world has chosen Ooft! Hot Sauce to grace every table in the Centre Café. Hot Sauce is growing in popularity in the UK and in Scotland but except in specialist Caribbean restaurants its unheard of to find hot sauce next to the pepper and salt.  Buy your bottle of our award winning sauce now with THIS LINK

Continue reading Ooft! home made hot sauce on the Table

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Langholm Chilli Club on the map

Langholm Chilli Club arrives with a splash in 2018!

Langholm
Langholm Scottish Borders

Just down the road from Ooft! a group of locals in the small pretty Borders town of Langholm got together and started a club. Now we are in Scotland the land of the golfer, the hunter, and the walker, but they chose to grow, compare, and taste, chilli’s from around the world. This year was their first festival and it drew a LOT of attention and already has over 270 members growing chillis.

BBC – The town that became Scotland’s Chilli Capital

The Times Newspaper – Langholm is the hot town for Chilli

Dumfries and Galloway News – Things are heating up in Langholm

The Dumfries and Galloway News said

By declaring the town the Chilli Capital of Scotland, the Langholm Chilli Club is hoping to attract visitors with the development of a new Chilli Trail and the first ever Chilli Fest at the end of September.

In Langholm, the Chilli Capital of Scotland, there are currently:

  • around 350 households growing chilli plants (Langholm has a population of 1800 and around 910 households) or one third of households
  • 3500+ chilli seeds have been planted in the town in 2018
  • at least 1,000 chilli plants
  • 53 different varieties of chilli, including the ‘Hottest Chilli’ the Carolina Reaper
  • 21 local businesses have their chillis on display
  • Langholm Chilli Club has around 60 people waiting to receive seeds and members across the world including Canada, US and Portugal.

They have their own Facebook page – Langholm Chilli Club

and are already planning their 2019 enlarged festival. It is so nice to see people get so excited about chilli’s. Clubs come and go but there is a real love of the chilli in Langholm and plans afoot to do something special in 2019! Their FB page self description is “We’re going to grow Chillis! In Langholm, Eskdale, Canonbie and ANYWHERE! For no other reason than because they’re AWESOME! “. That says it all.

 

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Hot Sauce recipe – Making Ooft! – Part One

hot sauce recipe

 

bad pepper
Fungus attacking pepper
process
part of the process

Hot sauce recipe – Making Ooft!

Hot sauce recipe – When we make Ooft! part of the process is checking each individual pepper for quality. So in the picture above carefully hand washed peppers are being checked, topped, and chopped ready for “long term aging”. The centre of the image shows the tops, sometimes they pull off but often have to be cut off. On the left is the good chopped and checked peppers. The top picture shows one of the problems we get, peppers are susceptible to attack and that’s why we hand check each one. We get our peppers from an importer in 3kg boxes which contain over 1000 peppers each so as you can work out this is a time consuming process. Our peppers come from the Caribbean the finest quality we can buy. But we believe its essential to start off right with clean peppers that have been rigorously checked inside and out.

As far as we know we are the ONLY hot sauce maker that does this. Imagine what is going into other sauces as they just blend it all up bad and good and bottle it!. Buy our sauce now using THIS LINK

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Extreme Hot Sauce using Carolina Reaper – Dangerously Hot

Extreme hot sauces - Carolina Reaper

Extreme Hot Sauces

Extreme hot sauce are we going too far? In a report on the BBC in April a man ate a Carolina Reaper pepper and ended up in hospital with a massive migraine. Doctors seem to think the pepper constricted the blood to his brain. LINK to story on BBC.

How did we get here? Well starting with Tabasco people have loved hot sauce for over 100 years. In the Caribbean hot sauce or pepper sauce is used daily on almost all meals. In fact as I often tell people on farmers markets if you go into KFC or Pizza Hut in Trinidad they offer you three sauces, ketchup, mustard and hot sauce all in sachets. Hot peppers are grown all over the Caribbean the most popular being scotch bonnet which we use in our Ooft! Aged Hot Sauce.

A Developing Story

So farmers noticed over time natural hybrids and began to name them, so in Trinidad there was a kind of blistery looking pepper and boy it was hot so they called it 3 pot as it could be used three times “in the pot”. So to get this, cooks in Trinidad pop a whole pepper into a stew or soup to add flavour. If it doesn’t burst then its mostly flavour with a little heat. So a 3 pot could be retrieved and used again. Later another farmer found an even hotter and named it 5 pot and later still a hotter named 7 pot. One farmer found a variety growing with a tail  and named it Scorpion as that’s what it looked like. After all the scotch bonnet got its name because it looked like a tam o’ shanter hat.

Scientists and Carolina Reaper

Now we move to the technicians, people who breed plants and hybridize them. In Carolina a man hybridised a pepper plant and got an amazingly hot pepper and called it Carolina Reaper and that’s the one that caused all the headaches! In fact it looks a lot like a Trinidad Scorpion, but then they all come from the same stock. LINK to The man who developed this hybrid

Carolina Reaper
Carolina Reaper

Our Opinion

What does Ooft! think of all this? Well we don’t follow fashion. Our sauce is based on scotch bonnets slow aged to develop flavour not heat. Yes its a hot sauce but chasing the heat for us misses the point. Hot sauce is not just heat its taste and we have tried so many other peppers to make a different sauce and just cannot match the taste of scotch bonnets. On your table you want salt and pepper and hot sauce, not a sauce that will give you a headache, but a sauce that will improve your food and make it come alive.

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Oxtails Caribbean Style recipe card

oxtail
oxtail
Stewed oxtails and red beans
oxtail
Recipe for stewed oxtail Caribbean style

 

Our new recipe card only available online is a wonderful rich oxtail stew served with red beans and rice. This is a traditional Caribbean favourite. If you buy larger oxtails then one per person will be plenty with the flavoursome red beans stew.

 

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Scoville Scale – Why are peppers hot?

Aged Hot Sauce, scotch bonnet hot sauce, best hot sauce uk, home made hot sauce

 

heat from peppers
Scotch Bonnet Peppers

Scoville Scale

Scoville Scale is a measure of the heat in hot peppers. Heat in hot peppers, where does it come from and why? I have just been reading a very erudite report at Harvard University about the origin of heat in peppers. It amazed me that all the pepper lovers in the world only got what they love, by a tiny change that a primitive early ancestor of peppers made to protect itself from attack by predators.

Buy our Ooft! Hot Sauce Now – CLICK HERE

Capsaicin – the basis of Scoville Scale

It seems that there are two factors at work, one is that rodents eat peppers and love them and they have such fine teeth they eat the seeds to the point they cannot germinate whereas birds eat the flesh and drop the seeds. So the plant developed a small metabolic change to create capsaicin the heat in peppers as the birds don’t taste the heat but rats do, so this deterred the rats. Pepper plants are also attacked by insects that suck the juices, and this defence also deters them.

The second is mould. Now peppers grow in moist environments and are very prone to mould and fungus, which attacks the buds and stops the peppers growing. Capsaicin deters mould and fungus so stops that attack as well. We notice this as when we age our peppers over two to three years, not only do we notice no deterioration, but laboratory analysis confirms that the peppers stay pure which explains our two year shelf life.

The article points out that the peppers pay a price for the defence. Producing the complex molecules for heat weakens the plants water retention capability and pepper plants with heat are much less resistant to drought than sweet peppers. Its a trade off they have made over time, but are we not so grateful. Without this development we would not have our hot sauce.

LINK TO ARTICLE

 

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Hot Sauce Brands – which is best?

hot sauce brands
hot sauces
Various hot sauces

Hot Sauce Brands – Like most “what is the best” questions there is a different answer for different needs so essentially you are asking what is the best hot sauce for me to use with my X, where x can be a hot dog to a quesadilla. The answer therefor can vary enormously. If I ask on Google what is the best Chinese restaurant in Edinburgh (a question I do ask all the time), I will get results that vary enormously based on the angle of the writer. So I will get told that this tiny take away is best in Edinburgh. But when I investigate the writer loves huge portions and is not fussy about quality. Well that’s not me I like good tasty food. One way to identify is to look at awards. A restaurant or hot sauce that’s won awards has at least been verified by someone. We are not big believers in awards but Ooft! has 3, Great Taste, Scotland Food and Drink and Quality Foods.

Our Own Ooft! Scotch Bonnet Hot Sauce

So let see what’s important in a best hot sauce:-

  • What is a hot sauce
    • A hot sauce is a table sauce like Ketchup. You use it on meals as a taste expander. Its not a marinade although it can be combined with other things to make one. So our Ooft! Smoky Chipotle can be combined with tomatoes and herbs to make a lovely marinade for chicken or pork or even seafood before barbeque or grill.
  • Type of peppers used
    • There are about 50,000 varieties of hot pepper each with its own unique taste
    • Some hot sauces us multiple varieties but we have tried so many and found that for us with our taste the scotch bonnet is unique and we have spoken to many hot sauce lovers at farmers markets and they share our view.
    • Heat – peppers vary enormously, there is even an index called the Scoville Scale SEE LINK that attempts to show heat. Some people (maybe the food equivalent of skydiving) want the “Hottest”. Our view is that this is a condiment. What would be the point of a salt that was so salty that even a grain or two spoiled your meal so all you could taste was salt? We concentrate on a tasty blend that is hot yes but also has tremendous flavour.
  • Quantity or percentage of peppers in mix
    • We think that a good sauce should have lots of real peppers. But the most popular hot sauce in the world Tabasco contains no actual peppers, just the liquid extract as its used mostly for splashing on oysters or in drinks. In the Caribbean people like to see some pieces of pepper in the sauce, everyone is different
  • Other ingredients
    • Good Ingredients – No hot sauce contains only peppers. If it did it would be solid. So pepper makers use a variety of other ingredients. In Ooft! we use daikon a Japanese radish that we think adds unami or taste to our sauce. We also use garlic, sugar salt and vinegar to season the peppers. But our most important ingredient is time. We find that aging creates a unique taste. Tabasco also ages so we are in good company.
    • Bad Ingredients – Almost all available hot sauces contain additives and preservatives. Just look on the bottle to see colourings, flavourings and preservatives like guar gum. At Ooft! we don’t think they are necessary in a good sauce. So here is a key way to identify a good sauce. if the bottle has any additives or chemicals or emulsifiers avoid it.
  • Type of sauce
    • When most people talk about hot sauce they are talking about the West, sauces from Mexico or the Caribbean or the USA. But there is another whole branch of hot sauce used by those in the East although most of these are used to season food rather than as table sauces.
  • Price
    • Go into any large supermarket and there are perhaps 20 different hot sauces from £1.50 to £5 a bottle. Why such huge variation? Well a lot is to do with processing. if you are making huge quantity of sauce, bottling as soon as you blend, and churning them out then you can sell cheap. But my wife and I who hand check every single pepper for quality wonder what goes into those bottles. We find peppers that are going bad, we find peppers that look great on the outside but when cut are rotten inside and we wonder. If you are pouring a million peppers into a hopper how do you manage that?
  • Aging
    • As far as we know only Tabasco and Ooft! age all hot sauce. There are one or two speciality brands in the US that also age but they are sold as the companies top of the line products. All Ooft! sauces are aged. Our experience is that when you blend the raw ingredients they taste just that, raw. After a year or two aging and developing, the difference is quite remarkable.
    • The aging process also eliminate the need for any chemicals. When you blend raw ingredients you immediately have separation. So most companies add emulsifiers and chemical to keep the sauce consistent. Aging removes this need as time blend the ingredients naturally.